UPDATE | Family of missing twins meets with sheriff

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Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017

AUGUSTA, Ga. (WRDW/WAGT) -- It's been nearly three decades since Jeannette and Dannette Millbrook went missing, the family believes some progress is finally being made in the case.

When the twin girls went missing no one was talking about the case. They disappeared in 1990 and the case was closed based on hearsay not long after.

The case was reopened in 2013, but the family had never met with the sheriff until now. Last month, the family sat down with Richmond County Sheriff Richard Roundtree for the very first time.

The missing twins' case was the focus of a podcast released earlier this year. The podcasters and family used this as an opportunity to show how poorly this case was allegedly handled and other missteps.

Shanta Sturgis, the sister of the missing twins, met Sheriff Roundtree at a community event and asked to schedule a sit down meeting with him to discuss the case.

She says they met in late August, "We are hoping to find them alive - even if we don't find them alive - at least we'd have some kind of closure because right now we don't know anything."

Her mother, Mary "Louise" Sturgis was there as well. She says, "I want them to know I love my girls - my family and I'm hoping we don't get justice where there wasn't none at all."

Shanta says a DNA sample was taken from her to see if anything if she is a match with anything the sheriff's office has in their system.

The family and podcasters say a reward is being raised for information related to the case. They hope that with a more active investigation from deputies and this reward, they'll be able to find the find the closure they need.

Shanta says a local community activist will be putting the twins' pictures on an electronic billboard along with other missing people from our area.

For more information you can visit the podcast's website here.


Wednesday, July 19, 2017

AUGUSTA, Ga. (WRDW/WAGT) -- One of the co-hosts behind a podcast about missing Augusta twins says the District Attorney's office is looking into the case.

Brooke Hargrove met with District Attorney Natalie Paine to share new information and to discuss the case.

Hargrove says she was told by Paine they were looking into the case. Her office will attempt to provide information to the family that was never given to them.

Hargrove says they're focused on getting this case the attention it deserves and the family as well.

She said, "Hopefully people will really galvanize around this issue and recognize these were children that lived in Augusta and they're still missing and Augusta can find them."

The DA's investigative staff will be interviewing witnesses and relatives who were never interviewed when the twins first went missing in 1990, according to Hargrove.


Monday, July 17, 2017

AUGUSTA, Ga. (WRDW/WAGT) -- The podcasters and family behind the Fall Line Podcast may have made a huge breakthrough in the case of the missing Millbrook twins.

They believe unidentified remains found in Aiken County in 1993 may be one of the twins.

This is a side by side photo. The family says they were told by law enforcement when the remains were first found -- that these remains were not one of the twins, they weren't given a reason why not.

According to the case history of the unidentified remains, the body may be related to several other unsolved cases of unidentified black women in Aiken County.

The podcasters say every thing they've found out they've passed along to law enforcement. They're hoping better technology and testing will provide clear answers.

They're still waiting to hear back from law enforcement.


Wednesday, June 21, 2017

AUGUSTA, Ga. (WRDW/WAGT) -- A new podcast is gaining national attention looking into the 1990 case of missing Augusta twins Jeannette and Dannette Millbrook.

The Fall Line Podcasts by Laurah Norton and Brooke Hargrove focus around the mysterious circumstances and investigation of the case.

Its been 27 years since Shanta Sturgis saw her sisters Jeannette and Dannette Millbrook. "We all pray that they come back and they are alive, so that's what keep's me going," Shanta said.

In the nearly three decades since they went missing Shanta and her family have not stopped to find out what happened to them.

The twins went missing on a walk home. The Richmond County Sheriff's Office closed the case back in 1991 -- they told the family someone told them the twins were back home family say.

"We kept telling them "no, that's not true. They haven't been found because no one in the family has seen them since March the 18th of 1990," Shanta said.

The case was reopened in 2013, nothing has changed, until now. Laurah and Brooke have been putting together podcasts episodes with the help of the family.

Mother of the twins, Mary "Miss Louise" Sturgis, said, "It gives us hope to know somebody is listening and that they will try to help us and bring some attention."

The podcast is taking it a step further by taking a closer look.

"We have heard over and over that there are no leads in this case. I have found that not to be true. I'm an amateur, I'm not a professional investigator, but there appears to be several avenues that could be looked in to," Brooke said.

The family's will to fight and persistence is what motivates them to do this. Laurah said, "There's no archive of information that we've been able to access. We've been piecing it together ourselves and we couldn't have done it without the family who has kept with so many things, kept records of phone calls and that's helped immensely."

Miss Louise and Shanta are waiting for the day they know what happened to the twins. "In the 27 years that they have been missing we have always thought about them," Shanta said.

With a growing audience, they hope to amplify the family's voice. "Miss Louise and Shanta have never stopped and so we just want to draw attention to the fact they haven't," Laurah said.

We have reached out to the sheriff's for any records pertaining to this case.

You can listen to the podcast here.

Read the original version of this article at www.wrdw.com.